May 16, 2020

Gammon Construction awarded HK$1.6bn contract to construct Lee Garden Three Project

Balfour Beatty
gammon
construction
hysan
Admin
2 min
Gammon Construction awarded HK$1.6bn contract to construct Lee Garden Three Project
Balfour Beatty's joint venture, Gammon Construction, has been awarded a HK$1.6bn contract by Hysan Development Company Ltd to constructthe Lee Garde...

Balfour Beatty's joint venture, Gammon Construction, has been awarded a HK$1.6bn contract by Hysan Development Company Ltd to construct the Lee Garden Three Project in Hong Kong. This includes the construction of 20 floors of offices above a five-level shopping podium, and a five-level basement including 200 parking spaces. 

Lee Garden Three, owned by Hysan, will be constructed on the former site of Sunning Plaza and Sunning Court. It is part of Hysan's future group of commercial buildings in Causeway Bay. This is the second major partnership for Gammon and Hysan, following the construction of Hysan Place, a commercial complex constructed by Gammon.

Siu Chuen Lau, Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Hysan Development, said: “In terms of office space, Lee Garden Three will provide a much needed supply for Hong Kong’s core commercial area. Situated below the quality offices will be the retail shops and food and beverage establishments that are part of our Lee Gardens hub.

"The entire new complex will be an integral part of our Lee Gardens community that attracts both locals and visitors alike. It will add even more value to our ownership cluster here at the Lee Gardens which magnifies our ability to extract synergies among our incredible tenant mix. We are very glad to partner with Gammon again to make Lee Garden Three a top office and retail destination.”

Thomas Ho, Chief Executive of Gammon, said: “We are delighted to have been selected by Hysan as the construction partner of this redevelopment project. Our team is committed to delivering maximum efficiency, a smooth running project and minimal disruption to the public.”

Latest construction technologies such as Building Information Modeling, 4D modeling and 3D scanning will be adopted to enhance the project’s environmental friendliness and construction efficiency.

The project is due for completion in winter 2017.

 

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Jul 30, 2021

University of Dresden constructs carbon concrete building

UniversityofDresden
construction
projects
CarbonConcrete
2 min
The Technical University of Dresden, collaborating with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the world’s first carbon fibre and concrete building

The Technical University of Dresden, in partnership with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the first building to be made out of concrete and carbon fibre, rather than traditional steel. 

The combination of materials, known as, “carbon concrete” has the same structural strength as its steel-reinforced alternative but less concrete is used, according to researchers at the university. 

The building, called “The Cube” is currently under construction at the University of Dresden’s campus in Germany, and is believed to be the first carbon concrete building in the world. Strengthening the concrete, the carbon fibre yarns are used to create a mesh into which the concrete is then poured.

Unlike steel, the mesh is rust-proof meaning that the lifespan of carbon concrete is longer than that of the more typical steel-reinforced concrete. This also allows the layers to be much thinner than steel. 

The design and shape of The Cube 

According to the companies, the flexibility of carbon fibre allows the walls to fold up and become a roof. In a statement talking about the building’s design elements, Hen said: “The design of The Cube reinterprets the fluid, textile nature of carbon fibres by seamlessly merging the ceiling and walls in a single form, suggesting a future architecture in which environmentally conscious design is paired with formal freedom and a radical rethinking of essential architectural elements.

"The wall and ceiling are no longer separate components but functionally merge into one another as an organic continuum.” Displayed as a showpiece for TU Dresden’s major project, backed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, The Cube aims to explore the potential uses of carbon concrete in construction. 

"Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource-saving construction processes, and switching to carbon concrete could reduce the CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%," Henn said in a statement. 

Bio-based carbon fibre under development to reduce carbon footprint

While carbon fibre may be lighter and stronger than steel, it has a much higher carbon footprint. Describing the material’s impact on the environment, Dr Erik Frank, Senior Carbon Scientist at the German Institute of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF), said it is “usually very bad.” To reduce the carbon footprint, Frank is finding ways to make carbon fibre out of lignin, a common plant-based substance found in the paper manufacturing industry. 



 

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