May 16, 2020

Glasgow Sporting Events Boost Construction by £769 million

uk construction
Sports construction
Stadium construction
Admin
2 min
Athlete's Village, Glasgow
Data reveals that more than £769 million has been invested in construction contracts to get Glasgow in shape for this years summer of sport, with...

Data reveals that more than £769 million has been invested in construction contracts to get Glasgow in shape for this year’s summer of sport, with more projects still in the pipeline.

New data from construction intelligence specialists, Barbour ABI, reveals that more than £769 million worth of construction contracts have been completed to upgrade the city’s sports facilities, with nearly half of this accounted for by the 35-hectare Athletes’ Village valued at £300 million.

A combined £217 million has also been spent on the Emirates Arena (incorporating the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome) and purpose-built SSE Hydro national arena at Pacific Quay.

The data also shows that £120 million was used to regenerate existing sports facilities in Glasgow and further afield, such as a £30 million refurbishment of the Grade A-Listed Royal Commonwealth Pool in Edinburgh and an extension to the National Swimming Centre at Tollcross Leisure Centre worth £15 million.

Looking forward, more than £50 million of post-summer regeneration work is already in the pipeline – a huge boost to construction contractors north of the border.

Michael Dall, Lead Economist at Barbour ABI, said: “There is no underestimating how much work is required to get a city ready for a global sporting event, so it’s not surprising to see the huge sums of money being spent on construction contracts in and around Glasgow, both new build and regeneration, over the past year.

“With the Scottish economy now growing past its pre-recession levels, and our latest Economic & Construction Market Review showing that the country dominated medical and health, industrial and education construction contracts in the UK last month, the future is certainly looking bright for contractors over the coming months.”

The 2014 Games kicked off yesterday with the opening ceremony.

 

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Jul 30, 2021

University of Dresden constructs carbon concrete building

UniversityofDresden
construction
projects
CarbonConcrete
2 min
The Technical University of Dresden, collaborating with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the world’s first carbon fibre and concrete building

The Technical University of Dresden, in partnership with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the first building to be made out of concrete and carbon fibre, rather than traditional steel. 

The combination of materials, known as, “carbon concrete” has the same structural strength as its steel-reinforced alternative but less concrete is used, according to researchers at the university. 

The building, called “The Cube” is currently under construction at the University of Dresden’s campus in Germany, and is believed to be the first carbon concrete building in the world. Strengthening the concrete, the carbon fibre yarns are used to create a mesh into which the concrete is then poured.

Unlike steel, the mesh is rust-proof meaning that the lifespan of carbon concrete is longer than that of the more typical steel-reinforced concrete. This also allows the layers to be much thinner than steel. 

The design and shape of The Cube 

According to the companies, the flexibility of carbon fibre allows the walls to fold up and become a roof. In a statement talking about the building’s design elements, Hen said: “The design of The Cube reinterprets the fluid, textile nature of carbon fibres by seamlessly merging the ceiling and walls in a single form, suggesting a future architecture in which environmentally conscious design is paired with formal freedom and a radical rethinking of essential architectural elements.

"The wall and ceiling are no longer separate components but functionally merge into one another as an organic continuum.” Displayed as a showpiece for TU Dresden’s major project, backed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, The Cube aims to explore the potential uses of carbon concrete in construction. 

"Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource-saving construction processes, and switching to carbon concrete could reduce the CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%," Henn said in a statement. 

Bio-based carbon fibre under development to reduce carbon footprint

While carbon fibre may be lighter and stronger than steel, it has a much higher carbon footprint. Describing the material’s impact on the environment, Dr Erik Frank, Senior Carbon Scientist at the German Institute of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF), said it is “usually very bad.” To reduce the carbon footprint, Frank is finding ways to make carbon fibre out of lignin, a common plant-based substance found in the paper manufacturing industry. 



 

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