May 16, 2020

Habtoor Leighton Group Wins $395m Dubai Contract

Mixed-use
Commercial construction
Dubai
Habtoor Leighton
Admin
2 min
Jewel of the Creek development
The leading middle-eastern contractor was awarded Package 8 of Dubai International Real Estates Jewel of the Creekmixed-use project in Port SaeedHabtoor...

The leading middle-eastern contractor was awarded Package 8 of Dubai International Real Estate’s Jewel of the Creek mixed-use project in Port Saeed

Habtoor Leighton Group (HLG) has been awarded a AED1.45 billion (US$395 million) contract by Dubai International Real Estate (DIRE) to deliver Package 8 of its Jewel of the Creek mixed-use project in Port Saeed, Dubai, UAE.

This award forms a significant part of the AED3 billion Jewel of the Creek development, which HLG has worked on since 2012 when the Group was appointed to construct and complete the substructure works for four basement levels and ground floor slabs on the waterside site between Al Maktoum Bridge, Baniyas Road and the Floating Bridge. 

HLG CEO and Managing Director, Mr. José Antonio López-Monís, said the contract with DIRE is of great significance to HLG: “We are pleased to have been selected as DIRE’s contractor of choice, and are proud to continue our partnership with DIRE on this landmark project.

“The HLG team is looking forward to delivering Jewel of the Creek to DIRE’s high standards.”.

HLG’s scope of works involves the construction and completion of: five hospitality buildings ranging between 15 and 19 floors, featuring a hotel and serviced apartments; a ballroom, with an attached café; a marina, including four foot bridges and one vehicular bridge; and hard and soft landscaping works.

HE Khalil Al Sayegh of DIRE believes this contract award is a major milestone for DIRE.

“We are confident that this landmark development will be a great success and we are pleased to again partner with HLG as our preferred contractor to deliver our innovative plans,” he said.

Construction works on Package 8 are scheduled to commence Q3, 2014 and completion is targeted for Q3, 2017.

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Jul 30, 2021

University of Dresden constructs carbon concrete building

UniversityofDresden
construction
projects
CarbonConcrete
2 min
The Technical University of Dresden, collaborating with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the world’s first carbon fibre and concrete building

The Technical University of Dresden, in partnership with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the first building to be made out of concrete and carbon fibre, rather than traditional steel. 

The combination of materials, known as, “carbon concrete” has the same structural strength as its steel-reinforced alternative but less concrete is used, according to researchers at the university. 

The building, called “The Cube” is currently under construction at the University of Dresden’s campus in Germany, and is believed to be the first carbon concrete building in the world. Strengthening the concrete, the carbon fibre yarns are used to create a mesh into which the concrete is then poured.

Unlike steel, the mesh is rust-proof meaning that the lifespan of carbon concrete is longer than that of the more typical steel-reinforced concrete. This also allows the layers to be much thinner than steel. 

The design and shape of The Cube 

According to the companies, the flexibility of carbon fibre allows the walls to fold up and become a roof. In a statement talking about the building’s design elements, Hen said: “The design of The Cube reinterprets the fluid, textile nature of carbon fibres by seamlessly merging the ceiling and walls in a single form, suggesting a future architecture in which environmentally conscious design is paired with formal freedom and a radical rethinking of essential architectural elements.

"The wall and ceiling are no longer separate components but functionally merge into one another as an organic continuum.” Displayed as a showpiece for TU Dresden’s major project, backed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, The Cube aims to explore the potential uses of carbon concrete in construction. 

"Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource-saving construction processes, and switching to carbon concrete could reduce the CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%," Henn said in a statement. 

Bio-based carbon fibre under development to reduce carbon footprint

While carbon fibre may be lighter and stronger than steel, it has a much higher carbon footprint. Describing the material’s impact on the environment, Dr Erik Frank, Senior Carbon Scientist at the German Institute of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF), said it is “usually very bad.” To reduce the carbon footprint, Frank is finding ways to make carbon fibre out of lignin, a common plant-based substance found in the paper manufacturing industry. 



 

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