May 16, 2020

HS2 appoints Lendlease for the £1.65bn Euston station redesign project

HS2
Euston Station
UK
Sophie Chapman
2 min
HS2 and National Rail appoint Lendlease to add green space, accessibility, and capacity to Euston Station
The High Speed Two (HS2)project and Network Rail has announced the appointment of Lendlease to develop the reconstruction of Euston Station, London.

Th...

The High Speed Two (HS2) project and Network Rail has announced the appointment of Lendlease to develop the reconstruction of Euston Station, London.

The £1.65bn (US$2.3bn) project will see the 54 hectares of the station site redesigned for more accessibility to the station, greener space surrounding it, and increasing seating for greater capacity.

The construction could lead to entry to 4.8mn square feet, that could be utilised to build 1,700 new homes, raking in £3-4bn ($4.2-5.6bn) for the UK.

“The arrival of HS2 gives us a unique opportunity to transform the wider Euston station site, opening up the station to the surrounding community with new streets and public realm as well as opportunities to unlock thousands of new jobs and homes, anchored around a common masterplan vision,” reported Mark Thurston, CEO of HS2.

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“It was great to see such a strong competition and I’m pleased to welcome Lendlease to the team,” he added.

“Their experience of delivering some of the world’s most challenging transport and development projects will be vital as we move forward with this exciting new phase in the story of Euston station.”

“We are proud and excited to be selected as preferred bidder to deliver the Euston OSD in partnership with HS2, Network Rail, London Borough of Camden, GLA and wider stakeholders,” commented Dan Labbad, International CEO of Lendlease.

“We believe this is a fantastic project in a key area of London which will provide opportunity for all and act as a catalyst for wider UK growth.”

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Jul 30, 2021

University of Dresden constructs carbon concrete building

UniversityofDresden
construction
projects
CarbonConcrete
2 min
The Technical University of Dresden, collaborating with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the world’s first carbon fibre and concrete building

The Technical University of Dresden, in partnership with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the first building to be made out of concrete and carbon fibre, rather than traditional steel. 

The combination of materials, known as, “carbon concrete” has the same structural strength as its steel-reinforced alternative but less concrete is used, according to researchers at the university. 

The building, called “The Cube” is currently under construction at the University of Dresden’s campus in Germany, and is believed to be the first carbon concrete building in the world. Strengthening the concrete, the carbon fibre yarns are used to create a mesh into which the concrete is then poured.

Unlike steel, the mesh is rust-proof meaning that the lifespan of carbon concrete is longer than that of the more typical steel-reinforced concrete. This also allows the layers to be much thinner than steel. 

The design and shape of The Cube 

According to the companies, the flexibility of carbon fibre allows the walls to fold up and become a roof. In a statement talking about the building’s design elements, Hen said: “The design of The Cube reinterprets the fluid, textile nature of carbon fibres by seamlessly merging the ceiling and walls in a single form, suggesting a future architecture in which environmentally conscious design is paired with formal freedom and a radical rethinking of essential architectural elements.

"The wall and ceiling are no longer separate components but functionally merge into one another as an organic continuum.” Displayed as a showpiece for TU Dresden’s major project, backed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, The Cube aims to explore the potential uses of carbon concrete in construction. 

"Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource-saving construction processes, and switching to carbon concrete could reduce the CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%," Henn said in a statement. 

Bio-based carbon fibre under development to reduce carbon footprint

While carbon fibre may be lighter and stronger than steel, it has a much higher carbon footprint. Describing the material’s impact on the environment, Dr Erik Frank, Senior Carbon Scientist at the German Institute of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF), said it is “usually very bad.” To reduce the carbon footprint, Frank is finding ways to make carbon fibre out of lignin, a common plant-based substance found in the paper manufacturing industry. 



 

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