May 16, 2020

IKEA celebrates the start of constructing new Sheffield store

Cllr Bramall
Deputy Leader of Sheffield City Council
UK and Ireland Country Retail Manager Gillian Drakeford
IKEA sustainability
Catherine Sturman
2 min
IKEA celebrates the start of constructing new Sheffield store
Home furnishings retailer, IKEA, today officially kicked off construction of its new Sheffield store. IKEA UK and Ireland Country Retail Manager, Gillia...

Home furnishings retailer, IKEA, today officially kicked off construction of its new Sheffield store. IKEA UK and Ireland Country Retail Manager, Gillian Drakeford, and Sheffield Store Manager, Garry Deakin, were joined by Sheffield City Council members Cllr Bramall, Deputy Leader of the Council; Cllr Fox, Lord Mayor of Sheffield; and Clive Betts MP in leading the ground-breaking ceremony for the new store.

Due to open in the late summer of 2017, IKEA Sheffield will be located on Sheffield Road, Tinsley, bringing its extensive range of inspirational, well designed, quality products at affordable prices.

On IKEA’s new Sheffield store, UK and Ireland Country Retail Manager Gillian Drakeford commented, “This new store emphasises our commitment to UK expansion and investment. Our aim is to make IKEA as accessible to as many people as possible, and we are delighted to be able to bring our home-furnishing offer to Sheffield.”

The new store will create 480 local job opportunities: 380 jobs in store and a many more. Sheffield Store Manager Garry Deakin added, “I can’t wait to open IKEA Sheffield and look forward to welcoming our new co-workers on board.”

IKEA is committed to investing in its people and paying its co-workers a meaningful wage that supports the cost of living. Therefore, all IKEA Sheffield co-workers will be paid the Real Living Wage*.

 IKEA Sheffield will be the retailer’s most sustainable store to date and will aim to achieve 100% renewable energy. The store is targeting a BREEAM ‘excellent’ accreditation and will incorporate a number of green technologies such as photovoltaic panels, rainwater harvesting and linking in with the district heating scheme.

Electric vehicles will be used for home delivery and IKEA will actively encourage co-workers and visitors to use sustainable transport options and will contribute in excess of £400,000 as part of the Section 106 agreement in sustainable travel. This includes improvements to the tram stop and cycle ways and will enhance the efficiency of the bus fleet serving the store. IKEA has also committed to improving local roads and junctions around the store to improve traffic flows.

Cllr Bramall, Deputy Leader of Sheffield City Council, said, “The new store will redevelop a derelict site and bring jobs and investment to the City, so it’s great news.”

The Sheffield store is scheduled to open in late summer 2017.

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Jul 30, 2021

University of Dresden constructs carbon concrete building

UniversityofDresden
construction
projects
CarbonConcrete
2 min
The Technical University of Dresden, collaborating with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the world’s first carbon fibre and concrete building

The Technical University of Dresden, in partnership with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the first building to be made out of concrete and carbon fibre, rather than traditional steel. 

The combination of materials, known as, “carbon concrete” has the same structural strength as its steel-reinforced alternative but less concrete is used, according to researchers at the university. 

The building, called “The Cube” is currently under construction at the University of Dresden’s campus in Germany, and is believed to be the first carbon concrete building in the world. Strengthening the concrete, the carbon fibre yarns are used to create a mesh into which the concrete is then poured.

Unlike steel, the mesh is rust-proof meaning that the lifespan of carbon concrete is longer than that of the more typical steel-reinforced concrete. This also allows the layers to be much thinner than steel. 

The design and shape of The Cube 

According to the companies, the flexibility of carbon fibre allows the walls to fold up and become a roof. In a statement talking about the building’s design elements, Hen said: “The design of The Cube reinterprets the fluid, textile nature of carbon fibres by seamlessly merging the ceiling and walls in a single form, suggesting a future architecture in which environmentally conscious design is paired with formal freedom and a radical rethinking of essential architectural elements.

"The wall and ceiling are no longer separate components but functionally merge into one another as an organic continuum.” Displayed as a showpiece for TU Dresden’s major project, backed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, The Cube aims to explore the potential uses of carbon concrete in construction. 

"Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource-saving construction processes, and switching to carbon concrete could reduce the CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%," Henn said in a statement. 

Bio-based carbon fibre under development to reduce carbon footprint

While carbon fibre may be lighter and stronger than steel, it has a much higher carbon footprint. Describing the material’s impact on the environment, Dr Erik Frank, Senior Carbon Scientist at the German Institute of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF), said it is “usually very bad.” To reduce the carbon footprint, Frank is finding ways to make carbon fibre out of lignin, a common plant-based substance found in the paper manufacturing industry. 



 

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