Dec 15, 2020

India’s Larsen & Toubro secures cross-sector orders

India
Residential
Power
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Orders within its Building and Factories, and Power Transmission and Distribution businesses follow on from major transport contracts
Orders within its Building and Factories, and Power Transmission and Distribution businesses follow on from major transport contracts...

The construction arm of Indian multinational Larsen & Toubro has secured orders for its Building and Factories, and Power Transmission and Distribution businesses.

L&T says that its B&F Residential business has received an add-on order from a reputed developer for the core and shell works of two wings of a tower, in addition to non-tower area works. The business has also secured a design and build order from a client to construct a municipality hospital in Nagpur, Madhya Pradesh.

Scheduled to be executed on a fast-track basis, the scope of the Nagpur project will include Structure, Finishes, MEP, and a Medical Gas Pipeline system to be built entirely in structural steel, including the core.

The statement adds that the IT & Office Space business has also received an order from a client for the civil shell and core works of a mixed-use building in the city of Bengaluru, Karnataka. The scope of work for this project includes a tower of 90,600sqft, which is to be completed within 18 months.

Its Power Transmission and Distribution business has continued its winning spree by securing another package to provide Electrical and Mechanical systems for tunnels in the Udhampur Srinagar Baramulla rail link project. The scope of work for this package includes a 33kV and 11kV HT power cable network, GIS substation, DG sets, tunnel lighting, ventilation and firefighting systems, and a SCADA system.

Another underground cabling package system has also been secured to improve the reliability of power supply in a South Indian city, while the business has also secured add-ons from existing customers.

These announcements follow on from the Indian giant securing several major contracts in the last few months. The company will be building the longest river bridge in India – a 19kms structure connecting the states of Assam and Meghalaya across the river Brahmaputra - and the near 88kms Mumbai-Ahmedabad High Speed Rail (MAHSR) project, popularly referred as the Bullet Train project.  

In October, the group recorded a consolidated gross revenue of £3,162,680 for the quarter ending September 30. During the quarter, with labour at various project sites reached near pre-COVID levels, the business saw a pickup in execution momentum compared to Q1 FY 2020-21 and achieved a sequential growth of 46 percent.

However, revenue declined by 12 percent year-on-year due to the lingering impact of the pandemic during the quarter under review, the company states.

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Jul 30, 2021

University of Dresden constructs carbon concrete building

UniversityofDresden
construction
projects
CarbonConcrete
2 min
The Technical University of Dresden, collaborating with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the world’s first carbon fibre and concrete building

The Technical University of Dresden, in partnership with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the first building to be made out of concrete and carbon fibre, rather than traditional steel. 

The combination of materials, known as, “carbon concrete” has the same structural strength as its steel-reinforced alternative but less concrete is used, according to researchers at the university. 

The building, called “The Cube” is currently under construction at the University of Dresden’s campus in Germany, and is believed to be the first carbon concrete building in the world. Strengthening the concrete, the carbon fibre yarns are used to create a mesh into which the concrete is then poured.

Unlike steel, the mesh is rust-proof meaning that the lifespan of carbon concrete is longer than that of the more typical steel-reinforced concrete. This also allows the layers to be much thinner than steel. 

The design and shape of The Cube 

According to the companies, the flexibility of carbon fibre allows the walls to fold up and become a roof. In a statement talking about the building’s design elements, Hen said: “The design of The Cube reinterprets the fluid, textile nature of carbon fibres by seamlessly merging the ceiling and walls in a single form, suggesting a future architecture in which environmentally conscious design is paired with formal freedom and a radical rethinking of essential architectural elements.

"The wall and ceiling are no longer separate components but functionally merge into one another as an organic continuum.” Displayed as a showpiece for TU Dresden’s major project, backed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, The Cube aims to explore the potential uses of carbon concrete in construction. 

"Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource-saving construction processes, and switching to carbon concrete could reduce the CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%," Henn said in a statement. 

Bio-based carbon fibre under development to reduce carbon footprint

While carbon fibre may be lighter and stronger than steel, it has a much higher carbon footprint. Describing the material’s impact on the environment, Dr Erik Frank, Senior Carbon Scientist at the German Institute of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF), said it is “usually very bad.” To reduce the carbon footprint, Frank is finding ways to make carbon fibre out of lignin, a common plant-based substance found in the paper manufacturing industry. 



 

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