Jun 17, 2021

Royal Caribbean holds steel-cutting for Icon of the Seas

RoyalCaribbean
Cruising
construction
Finland
Dominic Ellis
1 min
Royal Caribbean's LNG-powered Icon of the Seas aims to set sail in autumn 2023

Royal Caribbean International held a steel-cutting ceremony at Finnish shipyard Meyer Turku to mark the construction of Icon of the Seas.

Projected to debut in autumn 2023, the vessel will be the cruise line's first of three ships to be powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG). Click here to watch a video. 

"We made our commitment to making clean power at sea a reality – and soon the norm – when Icon Class was first announced in 2016, and we're excited to see construction underway on what will truly be a ship unlike any other," said Michael Bayley, president and CEO, Royal Caribbean International.

"Our decades of work in ocean conservation, energy efficiency and continuous improvement will be evident all throughout Icon. We look forward to revealing more of the game-changing features our guests and crew have in store as she begins to take shape." 

Royal Caribbean confirmed the first few scheduled sailings of Odyssey of the Seas will be cancelled due to positive cases of Covid-19 onboard the ship among crew members.

Up to 2,500 jobs are lost each day that cruises are not operating, according to the Cruise Lines International Association, which added that the worldwide disruption to the industry from COVID-19 has been $50 billion.  

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Jul 30, 2021

University of Dresden constructs carbon concrete building

UniversityofDresden
construction
projects
CarbonConcrete
2 min
The Technical University of Dresden, collaborating with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the world’s first carbon fibre and concrete building

The Technical University of Dresden, in partnership with German architecture firm Henn, is constructing the first building to be made out of concrete and carbon fibre, rather than traditional steel. 

The combination of materials, known as, “carbon concrete” has the same structural strength as its steel-reinforced alternative but less concrete is used, according to researchers at the university. 

The building, called “The Cube” is currently under construction at the University of Dresden’s campus in Germany, and is believed to be the first carbon concrete building in the world. Strengthening the concrete, the carbon fibre yarns are used to create a mesh into which the concrete is then poured.

Unlike steel, the mesh is rust-proof meaning that the lifespan of carbon concrete is longer than that of the more typical steel-reinforced concrete. This also allows the layers to be much thinner than steel. 

The design and shape of The Cube 

According to the companies, the flexibility of carbon fibre allows the walls to fold up and become a roof. In a statement talking about the building’s design elements, Hen said: “The design of The Cube reinterprets the fluid, textile nature of carbon fibres by seamlessly merging the ceiling and walls in a single form, suggesting a future architecture in which environmentally conscious design is paired with formal freedom and a radical rethinking of essential architectural elements.

"The wall and ceiling are no longer separate components but functionally merge into one another as an organic continuum.” Displayed as a showpiece for TU Dresden’s major project, backed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, The Cube aims to explore the potential uses of carbon concrete in construction. 

"Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource-saving construction processes, and switching to carbon concrete could reduce the CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%," Henn said in a statement. 

Bio-based carbon fibre under development to reduce carbon footprint

While carbon fibre may be lighter and stronger than steel, it has a much higher carbon footprint. Describing the material’s impact on the environment, Dr Erik Frank, Senior Carbon Scientist at the German Institute of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF), said it is “usually very bad.” To reduce the carbon footprint, Frank is finding ways to make carbon fibre out of lignin, a common plant-based substance found in the paper manufacturing industry. 



 

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