May 16, 2020

9 Tallest bridges in the world

Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge
Turkey
Russky Bridge
Russia
Catherine Sturman
2 min
Millau Viaduct, France
Bridges enable commuters to travel to their various destinations, strengthening local infrastructures and transport links in which they are situated. We...

Bridges enable commuters to travel to their various destinations, strengthening local infrastructures and transport links in which they are situated. We take a look at nine bridges which are the tallest in the world, displaying world-class engineering, construction, architectural and design expertise.

Millau Viaduct, France

Built in 2001 and completed in 2005 at a cost of approximately €400 million, the Millau Viaduct was constructed to reduce congestion near Millau, which is situated on the popular route from Paris to Spain.

Winning several awards, the cable-stayed bridge signifies a successful collaboration between designers, architects, structural engineers and contractors will remain functional for over 100 years.

At 1,125ft tall, the build incorporates over 120,000 cubic metres of concrete and over 18 tonnes of steel.

Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge, Turkey

Designed by French structural engineer Michael Virlogeux and Swiss engineer Jean-Francois Klein, the Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge is used for both road and rail. Completed in 2016, the bridge comprises of four lanes and a railway line.

Since its completion, the bridge has become the tallest suspension bridge in the world at 1.056ft.

Russky Bridge, Russia

Completed in 2012, the Russky Bridge within Russia is 1,053 ft tall.

Sutong Bridge, China

Crossing the Yangtze River, the Sutong Bridge in China successfully connects Shanghai and Nantong, boosting the economy.

Officially opening in 2008, the 1,004ft bridge won the 2010 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement award (OCEA), and has reduced travel time to the two destinations to solely an hour.

Stonecutters Bridge, Hong Kong

Opening in 2009, Stonecutters Bridge won the 2010 Supreme Award for its construction and design incorporating over 1,000 tonnes of stainless steel and is 978ft tall.

The construction had an array of challenges, in addition to factoring in Hong Kong’s strong winds, which impacted on the bridge’s design.

Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge, Japan

Completed after 10 years of construction work, the Akashi-Kaikyo bridge in Japan was built as part of the Honshu-Shikoku Project.

At 928ft, the bridge now connects Honshu with Shikoku, at which the build had to factor in the region’s unsettled weather conditions, with an earthquake even occurring when the bridge was constructed.

Yi Sun-sin Bridge, South Korea

Completed in 2012, the Yi Sun-sin Bridge within South Korea is the fifth longest suspension bridge in the world and is 890ft tall.

Jingyue Yangtze River Bridge, China

Completed in 2002, the Jingyue Yangtze River Bridge crosses the river and is 869ft tall.

Great Belt East Bridge, Denmark

The Great Belt East Bridge within Denmark was built in order to link Halsskov and Sprogo. At 833ft tall, the suspension bridge has enabled commuters to cross effectively and no longer rely on local ferries.

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Jun 16, 2021

France to invest €1.8bn in Egypt’s infrastructure

AFD
Infrastructure
investments
projects
2 min
France is making a €1.8bn investment into Egypt’s infrastructure with upgrades to the Cairo Metro and a railway to Sudan

France will invest a total of €1.8bn into Egypt’s infrastructure focusing specifically on upgrading the Cairo Metro, building a railway to Sudan, and developing water and energy schemes. Officials have called the investment a “major boost to bilateral cooperation”. 

The Cairo Metro

Included in the financing is a concessional government loan of around €800mn to upgrade Line 1 of the Cairo Metro, introduced in the 1980s. The financing will pay for 55 trainsets for the line and is provided by the French engineering company, Alstom.  

Line 6 is also due to be upgraded using further state-guaranteed loans worth up to €2bn. Bruno Le Maire said that this would be negotiated over the next six months. France and Egypt have worked in close cooperation ever since Abdel Fattah al-Sisi became president in 2014, despite differences over human rights and strong criticism of Egypt by rights activists and some foreign states.

Nine more projects over the next half a decade

A further €1bn from France’s development agency, Agence Française de Développement (AFD), aims to cover a range of other projects over the next half a decade. 

These projects include a railway line between Aswan, southern Egypt, and Wadi Halfa in Sudan, as well as several projects in the renewable energy and water purification industries. Bruno Le Maire, France’s Finance Minister, said Egypt was a “strategic partner and commercial dealings with it would be developed. France will substantially increase its direct exposure to Egypt, becoming the first counter-party for government to government loans,” he said.

According to Le Maire, the AFD will also €150mn to support the construction of a universal health insurance programme. French contractors such as Vinci and Bouygues have a long history of working on the Egyptian capital’s underground system. 

Talking about the relationship between France And Egypt, Le Maire concluded: “France will substantially increase its direct exposure to Egypt, becoming the first counter-party for government to government loans”. 

Image: MEED

 

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