Jul 16, 2021

Seafarms begins construction of Project Sea Dragon

Seafarms
construction
Sustainability
Engineering
2 min
The Australian aquaculture company Seafarms’ Project Sea Dragon aims to produce 6,000 tonnes of black tiger prawns per year

Seafarms, an aquaculture company based in Australia, has started the first phase of construction of Project Sea Dragon, a project which initially aims to produce 6,000 tonnes of black tiger prawns every year. 

The contract for the project, worth US$78mn, was awarded to the construction company Canstruct, which has begun work on Seafarms’ Legune Station grow-out facility, Bynoe Breeding Facility, and Exmouth Founder Stock Centre. The company is also planning to establish the first black tiger prawn farm, consisting of 36 ten-hectare ponds, 36 one-hectare nursery ponds, and the channels to supply and discharge them.

There will also be four seawater intake pumps, which can move around 7,000 litres of water per second. These pumps are due to be installed late next year. 

The progress of Project Sea Dragon so far

Seafarms says that the first 21 buildings at Legune Station which are needed for the accommodation village have been transported to the site. Work packages at the Bynoe Harbour Breeding Facility and the Exmouth Founder Stock Centre allowing for the engineering of buildings and utilities have been granted and work for this is expected to commence in September this year, the company said.

In addition, the Western Australian Government has pledged US$13.5mn in sponsorship to seal Moonamang Road, a road in Kununurra. The sponsorship continues to be advanced and will provide a complete all-weather sealed road from Kununurra to the Legune Station boundary. This will allow Seafarms to transport from where they will be grown and harvested at Legune to Kununurra. 

Similar projects: EX Venture’s seaweed farm

In March this year, EX Venture planned to establish an automated, open ocean seaweed farm in the Southeastern region of Nusa Lembongan in Bali. The company received funding for the project from the German government which proposed a three-year tenure for implementation. 

The aim of the project was to improve conventional seaweed farming using technology and automation, as well as revolutionary farming methods. This would increase seaweed production and decrease the time it takes to harvest it. The farm would also help to improve marine ecosystems and biodiversity, as well as create healthy nursery grounds for young fish.

Image: Seafarms 

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Jul 29, 2021

Construction workers urged to down tools for mental health

LighthouseClub
construction
mentalhealth
physicalhealth
2 min
The ‘Stop. Make a Change.’(SMAC) campaign, backed by the Construction Leadership Council, is urging workers to seriously consider their mental wellbeing

The construction industry is being encouraged to stop all work for one hour to focus on the importance of physical and mental health. The plea is part of the ‘Stop. Make a Change.’ (SMAC) campaign which is asking construction organisations across the country t spend an hour thinking about physical health conditions, such as respiratory health, work-related stress, as well as mental health conditions including, but not limited to, depression, anxiety, OCD, and bipolar disorder. 

This year, the campaign, which takes place from 11 to 22 October, will focus on individual workers, placing particular emphasis on how they have been affected by the Coronavirus pandemic. In addition to encouraging workers to consider their health, safety, and wellbeing, they will also be asked how those areas can be improved

Andy Mitchell, co-chair of the Construction Leadership Council, said: “Our industry workforce is crucial to all of our future successes. We recognise the heroic efforts these workers have undertaken during the pandemic, and want to make sure that, as the industry hopefully emerges from COVID-19, we continue to look after everyone’s health, safety and wellbeing.”

Around 200,000 people took part in the campaign in 2019, which has been running since 2017. SMAC’s website also offers conversation starter kits to help encourage people to talk about their emotions and wellbeing, making it as natural as possible. 

Suicide rates in the construction industry are increasing

A study by Glasgow Caledonian University found suicide rates among construction workers had risen to 29 per 100,000 in 2019 from 25 in 2015. Suicide rates among labourers increased by more than 50% from 48 per 100,000 in 2015 to 73 per 100,000 in 2019. However, the rate in non-construction-related industries has fallen, with just under five people per 100,000 taking their own lives in 2019 in comparison to 7 people in 2015.

If you work in the construction industry and need help, The Lighthouse charity provides free 24-hour, seven-days-a-week emotional and wellbeing support for those in the industry through its helpline available on 0345 605 1956 in the UK, or 1800 939 122 in the Republic of Ireland.

Lighthouse also has a free app where workers can access information that can be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play.

 

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